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How to Accommodate Your Home for Someone Suffering With Arthritis

Senior man watching elderly woman use stair lift chair on curved staircase

 

If one of your home’s residents is dealing with arthritis, you may need to make accommodations for that person’s health and safety. Here are some things you can do to help protect a loved one who may have mobility issues related to arthritis.

Stair Lift

If your home has more than one level that the person with arthritis will need to access, contact a stair lift manufacturer or distributor for information about available products that could work in your home. An electronic stair lift facilitates movement between levels in your home that are accessible by stairs and can provide mobility as needed for someone who may find climbing the steps difficult or impossible.

Handrails

If your loved one will be walking through certain parts of the home on a regular basis, consider installing handrails along the walls in the hallway, bathroom, kitchen, or other areas commonly used. Holding on to a handrail might provide added stability and security to someone with painful limbs or joints who has trouble walking comfortably. Handrails in the bathroom near the toilet and in the shower or bathtub can also help someone use those areas more safely.

Remove Tripping Hazards

Arthritis often affects people in many ways. Their joints can ache or throb and may become swollen. They might stumble or feel weak and be prone to falling. Look through your home to find and eliminate potential tripping hazards like throw rugs, toys, and shoes lying around. Keep the floor clear and free of anything that could cause a person with an unsteady gait to trip or fall. You may want to rearrange some furniture, like end tables or plant stands, to provide more mobility space for someone with arthritis.

Walk-In Bathtub

People who suffer from arthritis are sometimes advised by doctors to soak in a bathtub of warm water. To reduce the risk of slipping or falling while getting into or out of the water, you may want to look into getting a walk-in tub with a low threshold. It is often easier to step into a low tub than climb into a regular bathtub or to stand for several minutes while taking a shower.

 

Arthritis can be debilitating not only from swollen or painful joints but also by causing pain that can distract people who are mobile. Making changes to your home like those above might help to make life easier and safer for loves ones with arthritic conditions.

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